• McClure Health Science High School Logo   Title I

  • Important Dates

  • Title I Documents

  • Calendar of Events at McClure Health Science HS

    Coming Soon!

  • Family Engagement Tips

    Monday, August 12, 2019

    Practice improves awkward social skills

    Social skills can affect teens' success and happiness in school. But some teens aren't sure how to make and keep friends. If your teen isn't socially savvy, help him connect with a few friends at a time. You can also help him tune in to non-verbal messages. In a public place, look at people and talk with your teen about how they might be feeling based on their body language.

    English  Spanish

    Tuesday, August 13, 2019

    Help your teen think and learn about careers

    No matter what your teen's age, she can begin now to prepare for a career. And you can help. Talk with her counselor to be sure she is taking classes that leave her options for college open. Ask about assessments that will help your student discover her strengths, interests and possible careers to explore. Then help your teen research the educational requirements, skills and salaries of jobs that interest her.

    English  Spanish

    Wednesday, August 14, 2019

    Is your teen developing self-reliance?

    Some teens are more self-reliant than others. But there are signs that indicate a teen might need some extra help. He might be reluctant to work with anyone but the teacher on school projects. He might be unwilling to say what he thinks. He might always prefer being with a parent to participating in an activity or club. If this sounds like your teen, contact his counselor for ideas about how to help him become more independent.

    English  Spanish

    Thursday, August 15, 2019

    Watch out for extracurricular overload

    A whole new world of activities opens up once a child reaches the teen years. And many teens dive right in. This is mostly good. Activities build friendships, teach respect and can be an important part of a college application. But it's possible to overdo a good thing. As the new school year approaches, remember that if your teen has no downtime or is too tired to crack a book, it's time to cut back on her activities.

    English  Spanish

    Friday, August 16, 2019

    Build your teen's enthusiasm for reading

    By now, your teen is probably a competent reader. But he'll do better in school if he is an enthusiastic reader, too. Encourage him to read about topics that interest him. Bring home his favorite magazines from the library. You can also clip or bookmark newspaper articles about topics he might find interesting and leave them where he'll see them.

    English  Spanish

    Saturday, August 17, 2019

    Challenge your children to resolve sibling conflicts

    Do your kids fight often? Getting along with others and treating them respectfully is an important factor in school success. But learning to do that starts at home. To encourage this, explain to your children that you won't resolve conflicts for them. They must try to work together. Have them list and discuss issues that usually cause disagreements, and focus on solutions rather than blame.

    English  Spanish

    Sunday, August 18, 2019

    Suggest questions that lead to good decisions

    If your teen wants help making a decision, offer questions rather than answers. Encourage your teen to ask: Which choice would I be most proud of? What choice would a person I look up to make? How far into the future will each choice affect me? If others are involved, am I treating them the way I want to be treated? What will the results of each choice be? How will I deal with those consequences?

    English  Spanish

  • GCPS Family and Community Engagement Plan

    GCPS Family and Community Engagement English

    GCPS Family and Community Engagement Spanish

  • McClure Health Science HS Family and Community Engagement Plan

    McClure Health Science HS Family and Community Engagement Plan

  • School-Family Compact 2019-2020

    School-Family Compact, English

    School-Family Compact, Spanish

  • Title I Budget

    Coming Soon!

Mrs. Cindy Kinchen, Title I Assistant Principal
Lisa Wells, Parent Instructional Coordinator

What is Title I?

  • Title I is a federal program that provides funds to schools and districts based upon the percentage of students qualifying to receive free or reduced price (school) meals.  The purpose is to ensure that all children have access to quality instruction and resources that will enable them to meet state academic standards.

    1. Teacher salaries (which lowers the student/teacher ratio - to allow for individual, small group, and differentiated instruction)
    2. Staff development and release time for teachers to plan instruction
    3. Extended learning time programs
    4. Purchasing technology for classrooms
    5. Purchasing consumable and non-consumable teaching materials
    6. Paying presenters and childcare providers at parent workshops
    7. Purchasing materials and resources for the Parent Center
    8. Learning experiences

    All decisions regarding the Title I Program are made with the input of all stakeholders during the school's Title I Planning Meeting and Documents Review Period (and any other opportunities that parents are given to provide input). The stakeholders help decide which topics are offered at our Parent Workshops, how the Title I funds should be spent, what materials should be purchased for the Parent Center, writing, revising, and approving Title I Documents, and help analyze data based on our end-of-the-year parent surveys.

Parent Right to Know

  • Parents have the right to request information about the degree and qualifications of their child's teacher(s) and paraprofessional(s), if applicable.  Please refer to the GCPS Student-Parent Handbook or contact your school's principal for more information.